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Product Instructions


MUG PRESS: Swirl, USA and Ceramic Mugs and Glass Mugs

Substrate

Temperature

Prepress

Press Time

Pressure

MUG11SW, MUG15SW, MUG11, MUGK11, MUG11US, MUG02, MUG15US, MUG01, MUG15, MUGK15, MUG11SW, MUG15SW, DECO-MUGY, DECO-MUGK, DECO-MUGC, DECO-MUGM, DECO-MUGG, DECO-MUGY-CH, DECO-MUGK-CH, DECO-MUGC-CH, DECO-MUGM-CH, DECO-MUGG-CH, DECO-MUG15K, DECO-MUG15C, DECO-M
400F
3.5-8 minutes see below
Medium to Heavy

Additional Items: Heat Tape, ProSpray, Green Pad

Recommended Paper: DyeTrans Multi-Purpose

PowerDriver Setting: Ceramic Mug or Glass Mug use Power Driver: Unisub Products


Step-by-step:
All instructions are geared to the George Knight Heat Presses, these use the DK3 Mug Press or mug attachment for the DC16 Combo press.

Glass Mugs Require: 1/8" green rubber pad (P/N# HCR-1849)

MUG11US: 11 oz = 3.5 minutes

MUG15US: 15oz = 4 minutes

MUG02 = 4 minutes

ALL OTHER Ceramic Mugs:
10/11 oz = 4.5-5 minutes (10oz. ceramic mug will not image all the way to the top)

15 oz = 5.5-6 minutes

ALL Glass Mugs: 8 Minutes

All Swirl Mugs require heavy pressure, pull the transfer tightly against the mug. 11oz = 5 minutes, 15oz = 6 minutes

1) Print the transfer. Note that the typical imaging area is 1.25” in from the handle and .25” from the top and bottom sides of the mug. Beyond that, follow our directions for top to bottom transfers.

2) Trim the transfer to just over the size of the mug.

3) Lightly mist transfer with DyeTrans Pro Spray and let dry 15-20 seconds.

4) Carefully place the transfer on the mug, smooth wrinkles. Wrap the mug with protective plain white paper. Do not allow paper to extend well above or below the top and bottom of mug. This part of the paper may wrinkle and the wrinkles will imprint onto the mug. But DO cover the entire mug with plain paper or you may “caramelize” the coating and it will turn brown or yellow. To imprint closely to handle, use the green pad, wrap loosely at the handle bulge, this will allow more complete imaging.

5) Press with Temp/Time/Pressure settings listed above.

6) Cool ceramic mugs in room temperature water. Do not dunk glass mugs.

7) Remove any paper residue with a soft wet cloth or dish sponge.


Notes on the George Knight® DK3 Mug Press:
The mug being pressed must be placed with the handle exactly in the middle of the opening, otherwise, the squeezing motions will snap off the handle when the mug is clamped.
Only what the mug press pad covers will sublimate. Also, if you try to image on or below the bottom of the mug and the mug is tapered, it may not sublimate correctly.
The black mug with the white imaging panel has a tolerance of plus or minus 1/8”. It is very important to keep this in mind when making your designs for this particular mug.

To do a perfect mug with imaging as far as possible to the top-to-bottom and around to the handle:
1) Pro Spray
2) 1/16" green rubber pad @ 9-3/8" x 4-1/8".


3) Geo Knight press extender. You can tell if the press has the extender if the threads on the tightening mechanism are silver instead of black. This technique will allow full top-to-bottom transfer and 1/4" imaging from the handle.

DK3 pad replacement instructions:

1. Scrape off all green rubber carefully: do not cut the temperature sensor wire under the green pad at the bottom.
2. Removing all adhesive is not necessary: basic smoothness is all we need. Do not remove the band heater from the frame either - not necessary and won't help.
3. Apply high temp silicone adhesive to one entire side of pad.
4. Stick pad onto band heater. Put 2 mugs into the press back to back and clamp the press locked shut with EXTREMELY LIGHT PRESSURE, so the green pad is held in place evenly, but the adhesive is not overly squeezed out.
5. Let it cure/dry overnight.

Short version: scrape out green, stick in new. Let dry.




NOTE: Using the Latte Mug template can be tricky, here's video: Using the Rotation Tool for latte Mug Templates


Updated: December 18, 2013

:


DYEWRAP: Coin Banks, Ceramic Mugs and Steins, Aluminum and Stainless Water Bottles, Stainless Steel Mugs and Ceramic Shot Glasses Using an Oven Wrap

Substrate

Temperature

Prepress

Press Time

Pressure

MUG20, PB01W, PH11, DECO-LMUG, DECO-MUG, DECO-SHOT, LMUG14, LUVMUG, MUG01/02, MUG11US/SW, MUG15US/SW, MUGK11, MUGK15, RH-LMUG14, RH-MUG11, SHOT0, STEIN, MUG14/18/22/25SS, WB002/3, WB600
400F
6-18 minutes

Additional Items:

Recommended Paper: DyeTrans Multi-Purpose

PowerDriver Setting: each mug is noted


Step-by-step:
Note: 10oz ceramic and glass mugs are not suitable for imaging in an oven.
STEIN28G is not suitable for top to bottom imaging.

All Steins: Careful not to use too much pressure, it can wrinkle your transfer, use a protective cover sheet but do not reuse that sheet, it will have ink on it after one use.

Remove the water bottle lids before sublimating.

Note: The area of the travel mug beyond the white patch is sublimatable, so any bleed beyond this area will transfer onto the mug.

Coin Banks, Ceramic Mugs and Steins (all except STEIN16/K, STEIN01 and Funnel Mugs) Using DYEWRAP-10; PowerDriver: Ceramic = 15 minutes

STEIN16 and STEIN16K = 15 - 17 minutes (time will vary by oven used and type of image)

MUG20 = 16 minutes

Ceramic Latte Funnel Mugs using DYEWRAP02; PowerDriver: Ceramic = 15 minutes

12oz. Stainless steel mugs using DYEWRAP-10 (MUG18SS, with removable plastic insert); PowerDriver: Silver Metal = 8 minutes

Aluminum Water bottles using DYEWRAP-68; PowerDriver: White Metal or Silver Metal = 6-8 minutes

Stainless Water bottles using DYEWRAP-68; PowerDriver: White Metal or Silver Metal = 6 minutes

Shot glasses using DYEWRAP01 (Will not fit SHOTGLASS04); PowerDriver: Ceramic = 15 minutes - Use Heavy Pressure

TANK22: 16-18 minutes; Note Maximaunm panel size is 4" wide x 3" high; allow for slight curve of tankard

1) Print the transfer. Note that the typical imaging area is 1.25” in from the handle and .25” from the top and bottom sides of the mug. Beyond that, follow our directions for top to bottom transfers.

2) Trim the transfer to just over the size of the mug.

3) Lightly mist transfer with DyeTrans Pro Spray and let dry 15-20 seconds.

4) Carefully place the transfer on the mug, smooth wrinkles. Wrap the mug with protective plain white paper. Do not allow paper to extend well above or below the top and bottom of mug. This part of the paper may wrinkle and the wrinkles will imprint onto the mug. But DO cover the entire mug with plain paper or you may “caramelize” the coating and it will turn brown or yellow. To imprint closely to handle, use the green pad, wrap loosely at the handle bulge, this will allow more complete imaging.

5) Press with Temp/Time/Pressure settings listed above.

6) Cool ceramic mugs in room temperature water. Do not dunk glass mugs.

7) Remove any paper residue with a soft wet cloth or dish sponge.

Pro Spray is recommended over heat tape.

Tighten dyewrap to finger tight, then give it two more turns.

Place the base of the stein in the oven closest to the heat source.

STEIN16 and STEIN16K seem to work better when the backside of the transfer is lightly moistened with a wet finger (very lightly).



Be sure to wrap the entire area of the substrate with protective paper, There will be a discoloration of the substrate should the wrap come into contact with it.

Wraps should last for 300 or more impressions. To ensure the proper lifecycle, please closely follow these instructions.


Dye Wrap Notes:
Be sure to wrap the entire area of the substrate with protective paper, There will be a discoloration of the substrate should the wrap come into contact with it.

Wraps should last for 300 or more impressions. To ensure the proper lifecycle, please closely follow these instructions.

Wraps will fail due to improper torque applied to the fastener. You can ensure appropriate torque, time-after-time, through the use of a mechanized nut driver with an adjustable torque clutch. These devices are relatively inexpensive, $20.00 and up, and easy to use. We recommend the Sears Craftsman 4.8V Pistol cordless screwdriver.

To calibrate the nut driver's torque, simply finger tighten the nut on the wrap, then tighten further, using a maximum of 2 turns, with an ordinary wrench. Adjust the clutch setting on the nut driver to 1 and begin tightening the nut while cycling upward through the torque settings until the nut actually turns. At this point, set the clutch to 1 number less than the current setting and you're finished.

Another necessary step is to employ a double-redundant mug wrap system, at a minimum, and a triple-redundant system, ideally. That is, if mugs are being imaged back-to-back in a production run, then you need a matching quantity of cool mug wraps to swap in for subsequent runs. So, if you're running 72 banks at a time, you will need at least 144 total wraps to do the job. It is easier to do this with a triple-redundant system, as the term "cool" is less subjective than with a double-redundant system. Having three-times the necessary wraps is absolutely the best way to preserve them over time.

When a hot wrap is fastened to a bank it causes the material to irreversibly stretch. As the material expands it puts undo force on the glue bindings, which will eventually come loose. Further, it is a bad idea to subject the image to transient heat before transfer.

Should your wrap come apart at a glue binding, you can resecure it with automotive heat-resistant gasket glue. Beware of the rather lengthy setting time of 1 week for the repair to fully cure.

The fastener will permanently seize if it is not lubricated properly. Lubrication of the threaded shaft is required before you use it for the first time and periodically thereafter. We recommend heat-resistant bearing grease with a colored (usually white, red or green) tracer. The colored tracer provides a visual verification that the grease is still intact.

Clamp or clip on wraps must always have a layer of talcum powder on them to prevent any binding with the surface of the substrate. Properly talcing these wraps also will extend their life.

To retalc a wrap, clean both sides with a soft clean rag and a general purpose cleaner. Be sure to remove any larger portions of debris by hand before cleaning the rubber. After the rubber has dried, apply talcum powder to both sides using a clean dry cloth. Shake off any excess amount of powder. Repeat the process at anytime you notice the wrap is dirty, sticking to the substrate or not providing good transfer results.

If wraps are stored in an environment with other wraps, there always is the chance that the wrap hardware will damage the rubber on these other wraps. The best way to prevent this is to store the wraps rolled up neatly in a box or unrolled flat on a table or shelf.


Updated: February 5, 2014

:


Notes on DyeWraps

Substrate

Temperature

Prepress

Press Time

Pressure

DYEWRAP01, DYEWRAP-10, DYEWRAP02, DYEWRAP03, DYEWRAP-68, DYEWRAP04, DYEWRAP05, DYEWRAP06, DYEWRAP-173, DYEWRAP07
385° - 400°F
see each item
Light

Additional Items:

Recommended Paper: DyeTrans Multi-Purpose, TexPrint-R

PowerDriver Setting: N/A


Step-by-step:
Notes on DyeWraps
Be sure to wrap the entire area of the substrate with protective paper, There will be a discoloration of the substrate should the wrap come into contact with it.

Wraps should last for 300 or more impressions. To ensure the proper lifecycle, please closely follow these instructions.

Wraps will fail due to improper torque applied to the fastener. You can ensure appropriate torque, time-after-time, through the use of a mechanized nut driver with an adjustable torque clutch. These devices are relatively inexpensive, $20.00 and up, and easy to use. We recommend the Sears Craftsman 4.8V Pistol cordless screwdriver.

To calibrate the nut driver's torque, simply finger tighten the nut on the wrap, then tighten further, using a maximum of 2 turns, with an ordinary wrench. Adjust the clutch setting on the nut driver to 1 and begin tightening the nut while cycling upward through the torque settings until the nut actually turns. At this point, set the clutch to 1 number less than the current setting and you're finished.

Another necessary step is to employ a double-redundant mug wrap system, at a minimum, and a triple-redundant system, ideally. That is, if mugs are being imaged back-to-back in a production run, then you need a matching quantity of cool mug wraps to swap in for subsequent runs. So, if you're running 72 banks at a time, you will need at least 144 total wraps to do the job. It is easier to do this with a triple-redundant system, as the term "cool" is less subjective than with a double-redundant system. Having three-times the necessary wraps is absolutely the best way to preserve them over time.

When a hot wrap is fastened to a bank it causes the material to irreversibly stretch. As the material expands it puts undo force on the glue bindings, which will eventually come loose. Further, it is a bad idea to subject the image to transient heat before transfer.

Should your wrap come apart at a glue binding, you can resecure it with automotive heat-resistant gasket glue. Beware of the rather lengthy setting time of 1 week for the repair to fully cure.

The fastener will permanently seize if it is not lubricated properly. Lubrication of the threaded shaft is required before you use it for the first time and periodically thereafter. We recommend heat-resistant bearing grease with a colored (usually white, red or green) tracer. The colored tracer provides a visual verification that the grease is still intact.

Clamp or clip on wraps must always have a layer of talcum powder on them to prevent any binding with the surface of the substrate. Properly talcing these wraps also will extend their life.

To retalc a wrap, clean both sides with a soft clean rag and a general purpose cleaner. Be sure to remove any larger portions of debris by hand before cleaning the rubber. After the rubber has dried, apply talcum powder to both sides using a clean dry cloth. Shake off any excess amount of powder. Repeat the process at anytime you notice the wrap is dirty, sticking to the substrate or not providing good transfer results.

If wraps are stored in an environment with other wraps, there always is the chance that the wrap hardware will damage the rubber on these other wraps. The best way to prevent this is to store the wraps rolled up neatly in a box or unrolled flat on a table or shelf.


Updated: August 22, 2013

:



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